Archive for April, 2011

By Eric and Mimi Griffith

Here’s a tip…if you find Dan Kopman around town sampling Schlafly beers postpone your plans for a few minutes and soak in some knowledge.  Dan will answer any question you have and I usually hang out and listen as he delves into deep discussions with beer lovers on the finer points of attenuation and fermentation.  I know it may sound complicated, but believe me when I tell you that you will always walk away with a finer appreciation of our favorite fermented beverage and at the very least a free sample of beer.

We were honored and excited by the presence of Dan Kopman, co-owner of The St. Louis Brewery, at Cicero’s BeeSchool.  Mr. Kopman and Tom Schlafly kick-started the craft beer movement in St. Louis in 1991 after jumping through legal hoops and helping pass new legislation and now they are celebrating 20 years of great beer.  There was only one “Schlafly virgin” in class and I am guessing that 99% of our readers drink Schlafly and know the story already so let’s get down to business.

The Big Question

Before dropping beer and farm knowledge on the class, Dan offered to answer any questions and of course the first question was about the future of Schlafly.  Several articles have appeared in the local papers trumpeting that The St. Louis Brewery is looking for investors.  Obviously this makes beer geeks like ourselves a little nervous so we all sat on the edge of our seats as 25% of the current ownership spoke on the subject.

The Answer

Dan explained that the brewery is an “open-book company” and that means that even succession planning is discussed with the employees in order to discover what is best for the company.  “What happens when Tom is in a box,” is the question because Mr. Schlafly owns 75% of the business and has no offspring to inherit his share.  The idea is to create a “non-chaotic succession plan” that puts the majority of the ownership in the hands of the employees.  In other words it is not as scary as we thought and they are not looking for a gigantic, international, macro brewer to buy them out. Feel better now?  I know I do.

“It all starts on the farm.”

Dan Kopman came to beer school with a purpose.  He wanted to shine a light on the farms and the famers that make beer possible.  As beer drinkers we often become so focused on the finished product in our glass that we forget to think about how the ingredients got from the earth to the brewery to the bottle.  The Saint Louis Brewery has been at the forefront of the fresh food movement with their weekly Farmer’s Market, Gardenworks program and menus filled with locally-produced food.  That passion spills over into the ingredients they use and the beer they produce.


The Beer

Raspberry Hefeweizen – (available April-August)

Peachy and hazy in appearance with a raspberry nose.  Dry and tart on the tongue with a dry, wheat mouthfeel.  Great beer for novice craft drinkers or for enjoying by the pool.  Way too easy to drink, but at 4.1% ABV, you can enjoy a few.  I can almost feel the fuzziness of the raspberries.

Farm Factor

Schlafly uses pureed raspberries as opposed to a fruit extract which makes this a true fruit beer and also makes it an arduous process.  Raspberries are ripe in the summer, but Schlafly needs to brew the beer in February to have it ready for an April release…I see difficulties, do you?  All in all it takes 2 years to get the raspberries from seed to beer bottle, and you thought it was a simple wheat beer.

Scotch Ale – (Brewer’s Choice, available January – March)

This brew sits a little heavy on the tongue and checks in at 6.2% ABV.  The nose is sweet caramel and the taste is dark fruits, toasted malts and some molasses.  With the low carbonation it comes across a little syrupy, but it drinks well and warms you up.  A nice winter beer that makes me want to belly up to the bar with friends.

Farm Factor

Scotland does not grow hops so all the beers there are sweeter and focused primarily on malts.  Dan says that this is also because the Scots refuse to give money to England, even for hops.  And he should know because his brother-in-law is a Scottish farmer.


Pale Ale (Flagship beer, available year-round)

Dan described this beer as his best friend, and I can understand why.  If you haven’t had a Schlafly Pale Ale we might have to check St.Louis beer drinker credentials.  This was the first beer they ever made and it introduced many people to beer with flavor.  Dan tastes cheddar cheese, lemon and spice and I tend to agree.  I encourage you to bring this beer to your next party because it is a great gateway beer for the uninitiated.

Farm Factor

The recipe calls for all English hops including East Kent Goldings, Northdown, and Pilgrim.  More specifically these hops are grown by an 80 year-old farmer in the town of Kent,England.  This farmer is extremely vital to the beer because Dan informed us that there are only 12-15 hop growers remaining in England.  Suddenly I appreciate the everyday Pale Ale even more.

Oatmeal Stout (available year-round)

Schlafly brews traditional beers with simple names and this is no exception.  The Oatmeal Stout is creamy, but dry with chocolate and coffee notes.  Roasted barley is the star of this brew, but there are just enough hops to keep it from tasting too sweet.

Farm factor

The malt bill is 5% roasted barley, but that is enough to make the beer focused on the roasted flavors.  If you love beer, then you love barley so brace yourself when I tell you that last year we had the lowest barley output in the past 100 years.  Why?  Dan told the class that the nation is focused on 4 crops: corn, wheat, soy and cotton.  Subsidies create this imbalance, but hopefully demand for beer will keep the barley crops in the ground and we will see a rise in output.

Twenty Years and Counting

Some of you will remember the day that the Schlafly Tap Room opened and swear that it couldn’t have been 20 years ago, but alas you must face the facts and admit that time flies when you are drinking good beer.  In honor of the first 20 years of Schlafly the brewery will produce 4 distinct anniversary beers.  Each generation of brewers will create an original recipe and the resulting 750ml bottles will make their way to the shelves quarterly.  Look for Dan Kopman around town all year as he presents vertical tastings and samples the anniversary beers.  And let us know how many different 20th Anniversary bottle caps you can find. Cheers to Dan, Tom and the staff at The St. Louis Brewery…we drink in hopes of another 20 years of Schlafly beer!


About the Authors: Husband and wife Eric and Mimi have been attending beer school for about a year now and love every minute of it. Mimi was born and raised in St. Louis. Besides sitting down with a fabulous pint of beer, she enjoys gardening and spending time with her horse. Eric was born and raised in Texas. He enjoys sports and searching for the next great beer. A search he says he has been on for five years and one that will certainly never end. Mimi, on the other hand, just realized beer actually has flavor about a year ago. After having moved away for a few years, in 2007, this happy couple moved back to St. Louis and is enjoying all the St. Louis beer scene has to offer, especially Cicero’s Beer School. Cicero’s is lucky to have such an enthusiastic couple writing the beer school blog!


Advertisements

The First Pour: Great Divide Hoss

Posted: April 22, 2011 in Beer Menu

Cicero’s understands that when it come to beer, most people’s favorite is the latest and greatest new beer. Very few beer lovers drink the same beer over and over again. Sure, you might go back to an old standard, but you always try the latest beer first. For that reason, and others, Cicero’s changes their menu every week. When kegs kick, we change them up, unless we decide to keep it tapped for a while longer because it kicked so fast. With that in mind, we strive to keep you, our customers informed on our weekly changes. The “First Pour” series of blog posts will highlight and review the newest beers we have on draft for you. Again, we have a happy couple writing these posts for us. If you see them around, make sure and thank them for their hard work.

By Alaina Kantner and Mike Vecchio

ABV: 6.2%

Style: Marzen Rye Lager

Bronze Medal: Great America Beer Festival, 2009

Bronze Medal: World Beer Cup, 2010

Gold Medal & Overall Champion Lager: Australian Beer Awards, 2010

Today we have a fantastic year-round beer from Great Divide Brewing Company from Denver, Colorado. The brewery opened in 1994 back when Colorado’s craft beer scene was starting to really expand. Weird history fact – the brewery was started in an old abandoned dairy processing plant. Hoss is Great Divide’s take on the German Märzen/Oktoberfest lager style and it comes highly decorated. The beer has been awarded the Bronze Medal in the 2009 Great American Beer Festival as well as the Bronze Medal in the 2009 World Beer Cup. So you know you’re about to experience a very enjoyable beer.

So now that you’re up to speed on the history of the beer, let’s get right into the tasting. Hoss pours out a clear golden orange color with a creamy finely bubbled head. The aroma is true to the Märzen style, so you get a pleasant whiff of toasted malts, dark fruits, and a very light spiced rye. Hoss tastes of strong sweet caramel notes with earthy spiced rye underlying it all. There’s also a little hop bitterness on the swallow that fades gradually. The drink of the beer is creamy and enjoyable and you likely wouldn’t guess it’s a 6.2% ABV beer. Even with the ABV, Alaina and Mike both agree that this is a session-worthy beer. Even though Märzen is traditionally released in the fall, both Alaina and Mike really appreciated having a year-round take of the style. It’s nice to be able to sample a bit of fall all throughout the year. So come on by Cicero’s and enjoy a pint while dreaming of the Cardinals playing into October.

About the Authors  Alaina and Mike moved to St Louis from Ohio in 2008 and quickly jumped into the craft beer scene. Alaina has gone from drinking light lagers almost exclusively to enjoying maltier beers – most notably porters and stouts – and hefeweizens. In her free time Alaina enjoys reading, running, and attempting to teach their dog tricks. Mike has evolved from drinking highly hopped IPAs to enjoying a wider range of pale ales and traditional hefeweizens. Mike enjoys trying to teach his dog not to bark at anything that moves, reading about crime and gangs, and home brewing with his co-workers. Both Alaina and Mike have been attending Cicero’s Beer School for a year and credit it to helping them expand their knowledge of craft brew and assisting them to take the plunge into home brewing with their friends. Hopefully, they will bring in some of their home-brew one day.

Cicero’s understands that when it come to beer, most people’s favorite is the latest and greatest new beer. Very few beer lovers drink the same beer over and over again. Sure, you might go back to an old standard, but you always try the latest beer first. For that reason, and others, Cicero’s changes their menu every week. When kegs kick, we change them up, unless we decide to keep it tapped for a while longer because it kicked so fast. With that in mind, we strive to keep you, our customers informed on our weekly changes. The “First Pour” series of blog posts will highlight and review the newest beers we have on draft for you. Again, we have a happy couple writing these posts for us. If you see them around, make sure and thank them for their hard work.

By Alaina Kantner and Mike Vecchio

ABV: 6.2%

Lagunitas Brewing Company was founded in 1993 in Lagunitas, Califonia. Growing beyond capacity, the brewery is now based out of Petaluma, California and is known for their “eccentric” nature. They’re known for their irrelevant stories and spelling errors on their beer bottles as well as their generally wacky behavior. To give you an idea, their website gives you the story of “a day in the life of a bubble in a bottle of beer.” But don’t let this wackiness distract you too much, however, because Lagunitas has grown to be recognized as one of the nation’s most outstanding breweries.Today we’re sampling Dogtown (American) Pale Ale – an “Mondo Ultra Mega Super Premium Ale.” As you can see from above, the brewers don’t really give out specs on this beer, but strap in because it’s a good one! Dogtown pours out a clear tangerine color with a sticky white head that leaves some of the best lacing we’ve seen lately. The aroma – a hop lovers paradise – is a wonderful orange and grapefruit citrus blend. Dogtown tastes of citrus bitterness throughout the drink, but is exceptionally well balanced by the sweet pale malts which together give it a lemon and honey characteristic. What surprised us most was the swallow of the beer. You get a small snap of grapefruit bitterness, but it doesn’t overburden the tongue like other APAs or IPAs do. Alaina, who isn’t the hop-head in the house, kept marveling about how much she liked this beer. So for us, that’s the measure of the balance and care brewed into this beer. Overall, this is a really fantastic APA. While it gets a little more bitter deeper into the drink, the brewers really do a great job of balancing the beer. We really encourage you to come try it off the tap, because we all know that good draft pour from Cicero’s really brings out the best in a beer.
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————–
About the Authors  Alaina and Mike moved to St Louis from Ohio in 2008 and quickly jumped into the craft beer scene. Alaina has gone from drinking light lagers almost exclusively to enjoying maltier beers – most notably porters and stouts – and hefeweizens. In her free time Alaina enjoys reading, running, and attempting to teach their dog tricks. Mike has evolved from drinking highly hopped IPAs to enjoying a wider range of pale ales and traditional hefeweizens. Mike enjoys trying to teach his dog not to bark at anything that moves, reading about crime and gangs, and home brewing with his co-workers. Both Alaina and Mike have been attending Cicero’s Beer School for a year and credit it to helping them expand their knowledge of craft brew and assisting them to take the plunge into home brewing with their friends. Hopefully, they will bring in some of their home-brew one day.


Cicero’s understands that when it come to beer, most people’s favorite is the latest and greatest new beer. Very few beer lovers drink the same beer over and over again. Sure, you might go back to an old standard, but you always try the latest beer first. For that reason, and others, Cicero’s changes their menu every week. When kegs kick, we change them up, unless we decide to keep it tapped for a while longer because it kicked so fast. With that in mind, we strive to keep you, our customers informed on our weekly changes. The “First Pour” series of blog posts will highlight and review the newest beers we have on draft for you. Again, we have a happy couple writing these posts for us. If you see them around, make sure and thank them for their hard work.


By Alaina Kantner and Mike Vecchio

ABV: 5.7%
IBU: 32
Hops: Chinook and Tettnanger
Malts: Premium two row, wheat malt, crystal 75, crystal 120, chocolate malt, toasted hemp seeds

Today we’re sampling a beer from Nectar Ales, a brewery that has only just made it to the St Louis area as of March. Nectar Ales was founded in 1987 in Humboldt County, California. They challenged and prided themselves on brewing “all natural ales” using all-natural ingredients. As of 2003, Nectar has been owned and brewed by Firestone Walker Brewing Company (finally available in St Louis as well!). Today we’re sampling their aptly named Humboldt Brown Ale which is brewed with toasted hemp seeds. Originally this beer wasn’t allowed for distribution outside of California due to restrictions on hemp, but progress has allowed it beyond the People’s Republic of California. Thank the beer gods too, because this beer landed a Bronze Medal in the 2006 World Beer Cup.

Humboldt Brown pours out a clear brownish/orange hue with a light head. The aroma of this beer is deeply earthy and exceptionally unique. Both of us had trouble placing and describing the aroma, but for us it was not unpleasant. The taste of the beer? Well Mike embarrassingly murmured “ohhh nice malts” after his first sip of the beer. True to the American Brown Ale style, this is a richly malty beer that won’t disappoint. You get a nice blend of chocolate and caramel malts that play nicely with the toasty quality that the hemp seeds add to the beer. On the swallow you get a snap of hops that lingers throughout the drink. Alaina really thought that she got a nice push and pull from the hops and the malts all throughout the drink of this beer. Overall, this is a sturdy brown ale that all sorts of beer drinkers should be able to enjoy. At 5.7% you can also afford to have a few with dinner or while hanging around the bar. Stop by and grab a pint and tell us what you think of a non-local hemp ale (e.g. O’Fallon Hemp Hop Rye).

About the Authors  Alaina and Mike moved to St Louis from Ohio in 2008 and quickly jumped into the craft beer scene. Alaina has gone from drinking light lagers almost exclusively to enjoying maltier beers – most notably porters and stouts – and hefeweizens. In her free time Alaina enjoys reading, running, and attempting to teach their dog tricks. Mike has evolved from drinking highly hopped IPAs to enjoying a wider range of pale ales and traditional hefeweizens. Mike enjoys trying to teach his dog not to bark at anything that moves, reading about crime and gangs, and home brewing with his co-workers. Both Alaina and Mike have been attending Cicero’s Beer School for a year and credit it to helping them expand their knowledge of craft brew and assisting them to take the plunge into home brewing with their friends. Hopefully, they will bring in some of their home-brew one day.

Cicero’s understands that when it come to beer, most people’s favorite is the latest and greatest new beer. Very few beer lovers drink the same beer over and over again. Sure, you might go back to an old standard, but you always try the latest beer first. For that reason, and others, Cicero’s changes their menu every week. When kegs kick, we change them up, unless we decide to keep it tapped for a while longer because it kicked so fast. With that in mind, we strive to keep you, our customers informed on our weekly changes. The “First Pour” series of blog posts will highlight and review the newest beers we have on draft for you. Again, we have a happy couple writing these posts for us. If you see them around, make sure and thank them for their hard work.

By Alaina Kantner and Mike Vecchio

ABV: 4.7%
IBU: 20
Hops: Mt. Hood & Saaz
Malt: 2 Row & Wheat

Not only did Puxatony Phil declare spring would come early in 2011, but he may have also spoken with the John Hall at Goose Island Brewing Co. Due to a shortage of Goose Island Mild Winter 6-pack cases (the cardboard holders), Goose Island decided to go ahead and start brewing and distributing their summer beer a little earlier than usual. But to be completely fair, Schlafly still beat them to the punch with the release of their Summer Lager. The good news is with the release of so many summer beers this early in the season, how can we not expect great weather here in St Louis? Okay, it’s probably wishful thinking…

Well lucky for the find people of the greater St Louis area, most of us are familiar with the German Kölsch style thanks to Schlafly’s award winning Kölsch beer. However, this Goose Island beer is no shrinking violet, the beer won the 2002 Great American Beer Festival Gold Medal for the Golden or Blonde Ale. The beer pours out a clear golden yellow in color (or Sunshine as Goose Island describes it) with a white head on top. Off the nose you get light grains and a somewhat grassy aroma. The beer is smooth and light with musky sweet grains and grassy/fruity notes throughout. The hops also add a light bitterness on the swallow. This is another super sessionable beer that can be enjoyed throughout the spring and summertime. Pop down to Cicero’s and celebrate the fact they always keep Goose Island’s seasonals well in stock.

About the Authors  Alaina and Mike moved to St Louis from Ohio in 2008 and quickly jumped into the craft beer scene. Alaina has gone from drinking light lagers almost exclusively to enjoying maltier beers – most notably porters and stouts – and hefeweizens. In her free time Alaina enjoys reading, running, and attempting to teach their dog tricks. Mike has evolved from drinking highly hopped IPAs to enjoying a wider range of pale ales and traditional hefeweizens. Mike enjoys trying to teach his dog not to bark at anything that moves, reading about crime and gangs, and home brewing with his co-workers. Both Alaina and Mike have been attending Cicero’s Beer School for a year and credit it to helping them expand their knowledge of craft brew and assisting them to take the plunge into home brewing with their friends. Hopefully, they will bring in some of their home-brew one day.

By Eric and Mimi Griffith

David Zuckerman, Brewmaster for Boulder Beer, received a round of applause when he answered the question “How does the altitude effect the brewery?” with “Our brewers are high!”  How high?  5,430 feet high to be exact.  Mr. Zuckerman finally found a reason to make the trip from Boulder, Colorado to St. Louis…Cicero’s Beer School, and we are more than happy to sample his hard work.

The Brewery

After presentations from 7 different Colorado breweries in the past year, beer school students are well aware that the Craft Beer Revolution is in full-swing around the Rocky Mountain state.  But did you know that it all started in Boulder back in 1979 with the founding of Boulder Beer Company?  Over thirty years later Boulder Beer is the “last man standing” from the original craft wave.

It started in the usual fashion: 2 professors from Colorado University took a trip to Europe and discovered beer with flavor.  Thanks to President Carter’s deregulation of home brewing these craft beer pioneers could actually attempt to replicate these beers in the comfort of home (or a goat shed, in this case) until they perfected the brews and poured them for the public.  The penny stock craze of the 1980’s enabled them to build a bigger and better brew house and in 1990 the company was transferred to new ownership.

That’s when our presenter, David Zuckerman, came into the picture, and even after 21 years he is still passionate about Boulder Beer.  His brewing philosophy is to create unique and flavorful beers, but he’s “not trying to drive a stake through your tongue.”  David explained that he uses more hops in his recipes because boiling happens at 208 degrees in high altitude as opposed to the normal 220 degrees.  With each class we learn more details about the art of brewing and Brewmaster Zuckerman shared that each year the brewers must adjust their recipes to account for the differences in crops.  This allows the consumers to have a seamless beer tasting experience.  Now let’s taste some beer.

The Beer
Hazed & Infused

He says- This beer wears an orange to amber color with a nice, crisp hop aroma.  At 38 IBUs and 5% ABV, Haze & Infused is very approachable.   The dry hopping leads your nose to believe you will be tasting hops, but quite to the contrary I taste mostly sweet caramel and finish my sample with malts on the brain.

She says- My non-hop loving friends all liked this one, making me think it was a good gateway beer into hoppier beers.  It is medium golden in color with a slight hop scent.  It is clean and crisp with no overwhelming aftertaste.  Good everyday beer.

Sweaty Betty Blonde

He says- Weihenstephan yeast is the power behind this refreshing blonde wheat beer.  Banana and bubblegum lead the way with a slight hint of clove and coriander following closely behind.  This beer even touches on the quenching style of a saison.  Great for summer or when you want to be reminded of summer.

She says- I was a little concerned about a beer called Sweaty, but after learning that it’s named after a brewer’s mom I was ready to sample.  Betty is a light golden blonde beer with the scent of banana.  It has a dry and crisp finish and is very refreshing.  I will have to remember this one because it’s perfect for a hot summer day.

Flashback – India Brown Ale

He says- Definitely my favorite of the night.  Tastes of chocolate with hops popping out all around.  Five additions of Cascade hops are made throughout the creation of this brew…no wonder I enjoy it so much.  Balanced, but still strong on both malts and hops.  Two parts of my tongue are very happy.  Flashback might help convert a malt lover to the hop side.  The dry chocolate feel with the citrus hops flavor keeps me going back to find something new with each sip.  Most interesting beer we have had in a long time.  The 62 IBUs and the 6.8% ABV are well hidden in this modern take on two classic styles.

She says- I found Flashback to have a nutty scent, and a hoppy yet sweet flavor with notes of toasted malts.  This was my first experience with a brown ale and an IPA combination.  It was full of flavor, and was definitely different.  Try this one for yourself and let me know what you think.

Mojo Risin’ Double IPA

He says- This is the star of the show because of the 10% ABV and high but unknown IBUs.  Grapefruit and papaya jump out of the glass.  The taste is fruity sweetness at first, but the malts find their place in the middle of this brew.  And finally the Centennial hops pop out on the finish as my tongue tingles (in a good way).  The alcohol hides neatly, but the sweetness slows you down before you chug too much.  A DIPA is always a great way to end the night.

She says- The hoppy grapefruit scent told me I was in for a treat!  This dark golden ale doesn’t disappoint if you enjoy a hop forward beer.  Heavy pine and citrus notes are prevalent in this 10% beer.  The bitterness of the hops is countered nicely by a lovely sweetness on the finish.  Call it Nirvana for hop-heads.

The Last Sip

From their “get hazed” bumper stickers to their psychedelic labels to their zany website, Boulder Beer Company imparts a relaxed, care-free attitude and seems to remind us all “hey, it’s just beer, sit back and enjoy it.”  Thanks for the reminder, I will. We would love to hear your thoughts on the beers we sampled so please use the comment section below.

A short interview with Marvin Simpson from Boulder Beer

About the Authors: Husband and wife Eric and Mimi have been attending beer school for about a year now and love every minute of it. Mimi was born and raised in St. Louis. Besides sitting down with a fabulous pint of beer, she enjoys gardening and spending time with her horse. Eric was born and raised in Texas. He enjoys sports and searching for the next great beer. A search he says he has been on for five years and one that will certainly never end. Mimi, on the other hand, just realized beer actually has flavor about a year ago. After having moved away for a few years, in 2007, this happy couple moved back to St. Louis and is enjoying all the St. Louis beer scene has to offer, especially Cicero’s Beer School. Cicero’s is lucky to have such an enthusiastic couple writing the beer school blog!



The First Pour: Schlafly Helles

Posted: April 13, 2011 in Beer Menu

Cicero’s understands that when it come to beer, most people’s favorite is the latest and greatest new beer. Very few beer lovers drink the same beer over and over again. Sure, you might go back to an old standard, but you always try the latest beer first. For that reason, and others, Cicero’s changes their menu every week. When kegs kick, we change them up, unless we decide to keep it tapped for a while longer because it kicked so fast. With that in mind, we strive to keep you, our customers informed on our weekly changes. The “First Pour” series of blog posts will highlight and review the newest beers we have on draft for you. Again, we have a happy couple writing these posts for us. If you see them around, make sure and thank them for their hard work.

 

 

 

 

By Alaina Kantner and Mike Vecchio

 

ABV: 4.5%
IBU: 17
Hops: Mittelfrüh & Magnum
Malts: 2-row and Europils malted barley, Carapils malt

 

Summer has to be around the corner because Schlafly has released their Helles style Summertime Lager. First a quick history lesson on the Helles style for the uninitiated. The style was created in 1894 by the Spaten Brewery (in Munich, Germany) as a blond lager competitor to the widely successful Bohemian Pilsner. While not as popular as it once was in Germany, this style is still celebrated and enjoyed in the region of Bavaria.

Schlafly’s Summertime Lager is true to the traditional Germany style and technique. The beer pours out a bright straw yellow with a fluffy white head on a good draft pour. Typical of the style, there is almost no aroma off the beer. The initial taste is crisp, light, and unimposing. The malts give a toasted grain and slightly grassy – maybe lemony – taste throughout the drink. This is then followed by a light hop snap just before a very dry swallow. Schlafly cans this beer for a reason: it’s the quintessential summertime beer. So do yourself a favor and drink this beer up on tap and take some along on your next float trip.

 

 

About the Authors Alaina and Mike moved to St Louis from Ohio in 2008 and quickly jumped into the craft beer scene. Alaina has gone from drinking light lagers almost exclusively to enjoying maltier beers – most notably porters and stouts – and hefeweizens. In her free time Alaina enjoys reading, running, and attempting to teach their dog tricks. Mike has evolved from drinking highly hopped IPAs to enjoying a wider range of pale ales and traditional hefeweizens. Mike enjoys trying to teach his dog not to bark at anything that moves, reading about crime and gangs, and home brewing with his co-workers. Both Alaina and Mike have been attending Cicero’s Beer School for a year and credit it to helping them expand their knowledge of craft brew and assisting them to take the plunge into home brewing with their friends. Hopefully, they will bring in some of their home-brew one day.